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Bullet 4:34 Sat Feb 20
EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
BBC
Britain will vote on whether to remain in the EU on Thursday 23 June, Prime Minister David Cameron has said.
The prime minister made his historic announcement in Downing Street after briefing the cabinet.
He said he would be campaigning to remain in a reformed EU - and described the vote as one of the biggest decisions "in our lifetimes".
Ministers immediately divide

Replies - Newest Posts First (Show In Chronological Order)

SurfaceAgentX2Zero 4:35 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Those people that bought the council homes? Were they living in a house or flat before and afterwards? Because if so, selling them their houses made fuck all difference to the housing shortage, did it?

Hammer and Pickle 4:34 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron

“I'm calling you Thick.

Because you are. Have you only just noticed as I've been doing that for months?”

Oh dear - he clearly thinks he’s the Irishman in the pub out of Withnail and I. Imagine immigration being addressed to satisfy muscle heads like Johnson and mark the words “Pariah State” because that’s the way forward with hard Brexit.

The Kronic 4:33 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
They sold off council homes did they? Go take some meds, man.

Willtell 4:32 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Very useful research there Thickle.

Oh it's from Rand Corporation who include as their clients -"the European Parliament and the European Commission."

Wow how good to have unbiased reports to rely on eh Thickle?

SurfaceAgentX2Zero 4:32 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Not the Normans? Or Queen Victoria? Or Winston Churchill?

Silly cunt.

, 4:32 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
That's no way to refer to our leader who was a champion of the EU single market.

The Kronic 4:30 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Because the rancid dead cunt started it.

SurfaceAgentX2Zero 4:19 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
The Kronic 3:54 Wed Dec 13

Then why the fuck bring Thatcher up, you silly pretend anarchist?

Johnson 4:15 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
The lack of oxygen to the brain owing to his extended NECK can't help.

orwells tragedy 4:14 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Johnson 4:09 Wed Dec 13

Go easy on poor old Play-Doh mate, you've seen what he looks like, it can't be easy.

Johnson 4:09 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Hammer and Pickle 3:17 Wed Dec 13

I'm calling you Thick.

Because you are. Have you only just noticed as I've been doing that for months?

The Kronic 3:54 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
SurfaceAgentX2Zero 2:49

Erm, yes I stated that, you 'LOLZ'ing Asperger's ridden oddball.

Hammer and Pickle 3:45 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Exactly, Rand Corporation take Brexit as a given.

Gavros 3:37 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Or aware that Brexit can still be avoided.

SurfaceAgentX2Zero 3:33 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
The Rand Corporation appear to be unaware that the referendum has taken place.

Hammer and Pickle 3:29 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Meanwhile, in the real world where Brexit has hurt the UK far more than it has the EU, the Rand Corporation has published a report:

Fears grow across the Atlantic over Brexit fallout
Kamal Ahmed
Economics editor
@bbckamal on Twitter
12 December 2017

Nearly all the possible trading relationships between Britain and the European Union following Brexit would be less favourable than staying in the European Union, according to an influential US think tank.

The Rand Corporation study said the worst option would be a "no deal".

That would leave the UK economy 4.9% poorer by 2029.

"No deal" would also have a negative effect on the EU economy, but it would be "relatively minor".

The report said that even a "soft Brexit" involving staying in the free market would not be as positive economically as staying in the EU.

Rand plays a significant role in America, with half of its funding coming from the US government.

In Europe it has advised the UK government on policy issues such as mental health, as well as the European Parliament and the European Commission.

Did 'soft Brexit' just win?
Failure to plan for post-Brexit borders 'reckless'
UK warned on cost of 'hard Brexit'
Its report argues that Brexit was likely to have a "mostly negative effect" on American interests in Europe, given the UK is a firm ally of the US in security matters and a supporter of free markets.

"An EU without the UK may be more willing to create barriers for non-EU companies, to the detriment of US companies and the American economy," the report says.

"In the development of EU defence policy, for example, the UK aim was often to ensure that EU measures did not undermine NATO and the strong transatlantic partnership."

That approach could change once Britain has left the EU.

'How much worse-off'
The Rand report said that there was only one option that would leave the UK better off outside the European Union: a comprehensive three-way free trade deal between Britain, the US and the EU.

But the report admits that is an extremely unlikely scenario, given that the present trade negotiations between the US and the EU (the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) are not supported by President Donald Trump and are "in a hiatus".

"The analysis clearly shows that the UK will be economically worse-off outside of the EU under most trade scenarios - the key question for the UK is how much worse-off," said Charles Ries, a vice-president at Rand and the report's lead author.

"It is in the best interests of the UK, and to a lesser extent the EU, to achieve some sort of open trading and investment relationship post-Brexit."

Mr Ries is former US ambassador to Greece and was also principal deputy assistant secretary of state for European affairs in the US between 2000 and 2004.

Although the report says that a loss of growth caused by leaving the EU could in part be compensated for by free trade deals with other countries such as India and China, they would be difficult to execute.

"Since the EU has a political incentive to demonstrate that the UK is worse off as a result of leaving the EU (so as to discourage other departures), and some in the UK believe the costs of 'no deal' are low, there is a real risk that the parties - even while seeking to cooperate - will find themselves struggling to reach any agreement," the report says.

"Unfortunately for the UK, 'no deal' - or, indeed, any of the 'hard Brexit' scenarios - is the worst situation for the future, with significant losses in terms of economic growth."

The report says that many American companies invest in the UK because it offers open access to the EU.

It argues that foreign direct investment (FDI) has been boosted by 28% because of the UK's membership of the EU.

'Fault lines'
"Our research indicates that a fall back to World Trade Organisation rules would reduce EU FDI inflow into the UK by about $7.8bn (£5.8bn).

"If the UK signs a comprehensive FTA [free trade agreement] with the EU, investment from the EU would fall by $3.4bn - a reduction of about 9% from EU membership investment levels.

"Signing an FTA with the United States would add about $3.2bn in FDI inflows for the UK from our baseline scenario, making up about one-third of investment lost due to termination of EU membership. The best option would be to conclude a three-way UK-EU-US trade agreement."

Rand says that once free trade negotiations start, "several fault lines" could emerge among the remaining 27 members of the EU, which may put the UK in a stronger position.

"These include the diverging interests of the countries that use the euro currency and those that do not, as well as the diverging interests of those countries that are net contributors to the EU budget and those that are net recipients," the report says.

"Interests could also diverge on regional bases. Northern European countries may seek the maximum possible free movement of goods while trying to lure the financial industry from London to their countries.

"Southern European countries may focus on securing a high financial settlement from the UK and preserving agricultural and fisheries policies.

"And eastern European countries may seek strong protections for their citizens currently in the UK. These differing priorities may come into play as trade-offs are made."

Gavros 3:28 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Will tell finally admits he's a retard

pulhampete 3:24 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Oh dear.
Your life must be so fucking empty if you can't handle healthy debate with someone who didn't actually disagree with your overall points but pulled you up on part of one of your arguments.

You thin skinned no mark cunt.

Willtell 3:20 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
H&P that is although actually it applies to you too pulhampete

Willtell 3:19 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Speaking of pointless wankers....right on cue!

pulhampete 3:19 Wed Dec 13
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Willtell
Great come back, not sure why I should leave North Norfolk for North Korea though.


You waste of fucking skin.

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