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Bullet 4:34 Sat Feb 20
EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
BBC
Britain will vote on whether to remain in the EU on Thursday 23 June, Prime Minister David Cameron has said.
The prime minister made his historic announcement in Downing Street after briefing the cabinet.
He said he would be campaigning to remain in a reformed EU - and described the vote as one of the biggest decisions "in our lifetimes".
Ministers immediately divide

Replies - Newest Posts First (Show In Chronological Order)

Willtell 6:37 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
What difference does any of this make? Britain is leaving the EU end of story....

Johnson 6:16 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Everything Branded says is irrelevant.

Mike Oxsaw 6:15 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
goose 5:43 Wed May 23

If that works to the benefit of all 4 nations, what's not to like about it?

Dr Moose 6:07 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
BRANDED 4:29 Wed May 23

Of course they will, we're still in the EU, as we like to be told when there is a bit of good news, so can't negotiate deals till we leave so your statement is irrelevant.

Gavros 5:44 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
yeah, well simple.

goose 5:43 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
maybe Italy, Greece & Spain will all leave the EU and we can fix some nice little trade deals between us.

they can sell us all their lovely local produce & crappy cars......... we can go on holiday there without a visa.

simple this brexit business.

Prometheus50 5:28 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
H&P

Ever wondered why German officials and economists touted (and may still be touting) the idea of a "North South two tier euro" split ?

After8 5:27 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Why are you all STILL arguing?

Hammer and Pickle 5:10 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
The Italian economy has not grown but the Dutch economy has.

Both are eurozone economies.

Your brain does not work.

Mike Oxsaw 4:56 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
"Some straight Italian savers and pension holders may or may not get burnt."

=

"Some Europeans may or may not get raped in the fanatical pursuit of implementing open borders within the group and imposing immigration take-up quotas on the member states".

Good thing it's "other people", eh, pickled?

Were they probably deserving of it? Come on! YOU claim to be the knowledgeable oracle on these things.

Prometheus50 4:55 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
H&P

Italian growth since joining the single currency has been zero

Their indebtedness has essentially forced a devaluation of their economy from which a bad problem got discernibly worse

If people are serious about reforming the EU (and you H&P do not qualify as even partly serious) then it must start with an acceptance that the single currency should be abandoned, even if it is broken up over a 15 to 20 year period, and let Europe's economies find their proper level with their own currency than be suffocated by the Euro and there is no more stimulus coming from the ECB

Johnson 4:53 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Is that akin to how they tucked up Greece, Thickle?

Hammer and Pickle 4:45 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Italian banks are riddled with bad debt, which the EU will only help bail out if Italian banks put their house in order by reaching for the vast amounts of dodgy liquidity they hold. Some straight Italian savers and pension holders may or may not get burnt. However, voting for Eurosceptic nutjobs is not going to help them in their plight.

Gavros 4:41 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Serious people are now talking a 3 year post transition with the CU backstop followed by SM + Max Fac.

May not totally fly but very close to the EFTA/ EEA as to make it indistinguishable.

ie BINO

Prometheus50 4:32 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
H&P

For reason beyond comprehension, the Italian MIB has been the best performing ytd equity index in Europe

Given the polls have for a long time pointed to a significant surge of support for 5* and Lega (notably by the young who have suffered the most in the single currency as youth unemployment remains at 36%) that anyone is surprised by their election win is baffling

Italy also has the highest levels of debt other than Greece, currently standing at 132% of GDP and whilst much is domestically held by Italian households, the Italian banking sector is at severe risk from NPLs , the ratio currently standing at 10% which the EU syas needs to be bailed in to resuce the Italian financial sector. Bailing in means household savings would be wiped out, so you can understand why 52% of Italians voted for anti EU parties and why the market is now pricing increased risk with Italian assets

Hammer and Pickle 4:30 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
You don't read it so why comment COCK?

BRANDED 4:29 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
EU beats UK to opening trade deal talks with Australia and New Zealand

riosleftsock 4:21 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
The FT is far removed from the real world. Its an EU tribute rag, staffed by pro-european luvvies and funded by foreigners.

Hammer and Pickle 3:56 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
Meanwhile, in the real world, this is what the markets think of populist nutjob Eurosceptics in power and the consequences of the resulting debt sell off for the price of borrowing

https://www.ft.com/content/0ed87bcc-5e6f-11e8-9334-2218e7146b04

Kate Allen 3 HOURS AGO
Italian bond prices have taken another leg downwards and the country’s equity markets sold off as political turbulence in the eurozone’s third-largest economy continues to rumble markets.

The anti-establishment Five Star Movement and the far-right League — which are close to forming a government — have become locked in a stand-off with Sergio Mattarella, the country’s president, after pushing for a staunchly Eurosceptic economist to be finance minister. 

Yields on 10-year Italian debt hit 2.45 per cent in Wednesday’s trading, up 12 basis points on the day to their highest level since March 2017. Yields rise when prices fall.

The move comes after a day of stability in the Italian markets on Tuesday, which followed several successive days of sharp increases. The 10-year yield has risen by 67 basis points since the start of this month amid repeated bouts of selling.

Its spread over the equivalent German bond — an indicator of eurozone political stress — reached 192 basis points on Wednesday, its highest level since June last year.

The FTSE MIB index of leading shares fell 2 per cent on the day, with bank stocks leading it downwards. Shares in Monte dei Paschi di Siena are down 1.4 per cent, while UBI Banca has fallen by 2 per cent, UniCredit is down 1.3 per cent and Intesa Sanpaolo has dipped by 0.9 per cent.

Monte dei Paschi’s bonds are also selling off; the yield on its €750m Tier 2 bond climbed to a record high of 8.2 per cent in today’s trading. Monte dei Paschi raised the debt, which counts towards its capital ratios, at 5.375 per cent in January and had planned to sell a further €700m of such paper before the year-end to strengthen its balance sheet.

Concerns have emerged about Italian banks’ non-performing loans; the two populist parties have said they will repeal laws allowing banks to forcibly recover debts from Italian citizens without judicial approval. The share prices of bad debt collection specialists such as Cerved and DoBank have fallen heavily this past week.

David Simner, a portfolio manager at Fidelity International, said there had been “a sense of panic in the air” in recent days.

“Investors have scrambled to reduce risk as the spending implications of the new government has naturally caused concerns over the future dynamics of the debt load of a country which is already very heavily laden,” he said.

Many investors were waiting “to see if [the market] has found a new lower clearing level that may provide some consolidation”, Mr Simner added.

Mike Oxsaw 3:25 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
What's the betting that Pickled has an EU flag duvet cover, bedside light and bedroom rug; he also has a prayer mat in the form of the EU flag and every evening gets down on his knees and structurally bangs his head on it 27 times?

Hammer and Pickle 3:22 Wed May 23
Re: EU Referendum 23rd June 2016 declares Cameron
There is absolutely no contradiction in my real posts (as opposed to the ones that are imaginary, like everything else driving Brexiter bullshit).

The ECB can raise rates like any central bank. Currently there is no need for it to do so and the markets agree, with fluctuations of the euro to all other currencies, including the dollar, too minor to be even remotely newsworthy.

Meanwhile I suggest Johnson and iRon stop wanking each other off - it’s putting off the normal WHO readers.

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