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Son of Sam 11:44 Sun Jan 27
English grammar question
Re a bit of english homework , can anyone tell me is this wrong?

a young Japanese couple, and several other patrons filled the dining areas, all whom seemed to be enjoying their experience.

should the whom read who or of whom or is it ok ? Thanks in advance

Replies - Newest Posts First (Show In Chronological Order)

harold 10:14 Wed Jan 30
Re: English grammar question
HP,
Comma after patrons; are you sure?

Willtell 12:25 Wed Jan 30
Re: English grammar question
Westham67 11:44 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Willtell 11:19 Tue Jan 29
Stop being such a creep "Is this ok surface sir"
----------------


Stop being an objectionable prick as I never said that at all.

Surface is the one poster on here that I am guessing was an English language professor that's all.

Noah 11:06 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Link to the Jap bird...

They go sideways you know.

ironsofcanada 3:25 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
And correcting the second post

* a year

ironsofcanada 3:25 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Sorry 3:21 was for coffee

ironsofcanada 3:24 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
stewie griffin 2:59 Tue Jan 29

Asking me less than year in advance?
Who do you think I am?

ironsofcanada 3:21 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
The "all of whom" sounds good because you use "whom" (and other accusative/object pronouns - like them or him or her) to replace the object, not just of verbs but also of prepositions.

Take out the preposition "of" see how it sounds.

So in that three words, it sounds correct but remember what you are trying to say in the whole sentence.

The subject of the main clause - all the people - who "filled the dining areas" are also the subject of the second clause (that we have in the OP).

They (another clue) also "seemed to be enjoying their experience." "Whom" definitely refers to an object, which in the main clause of this sentence is "dining areas."

As I said before the current rules of grammar don't always sound right these days. Look at how much we normally go the other way, using "who" when we should use "whom"

Whom did you hit?
Whom do you think we should support?
The man whom you met yesterday is coming to dinner.

Are the correct usage.

BRANDED 3:13 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
A couple of young nips and some other peeps were having a knees up in the caff.

stewie griffin 2:59 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Canada son!

Would you like to come to my place for Christmas this year?

Coffee 2:53 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
ioc

I'm still NOT convinced it should be who.

The "all of..." thing is the spanner in the works of who.

ironsofcanada 2:20 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
For those new to the thread, the actual sentence is much, much longer and as said by someone, an abomination. (Scroll back if you need to see it.)

Sam's question was just about the "whom"

It should be "who"


Most simply, because it is replacing the subject of the sentence - all the people - and not the object - the dining spaces. So "whom" or "them", pronouns in a subjective form, are grammatically incorrect, whether you make them sound better with "all of" in front of them or not.

Mike Oxsaw 1:33 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
How about a more who-esque:

"Fucking Japanese: coming over here, eating at our tables"?

Westham67 11:44 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Willtell 11:19 Tue Jan 29

Stop being such a creep "Is this ok surface sir"

Fivetide 11:32 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Split into two sentences, avoiding the clunky 'whom' entirely.

Razzle 11:30 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
i wiped ones cock on a young Japanese ladies face

Willtell 11:19 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
I would say -
"A young Japanese couple, and several other patrons filled the dining areas - all OF THEM seemed to be enjoying their experience."

That gets you out of a problem I think? Surface is the one for this...

w4hammer 11:13 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
a young Japanese couple, and several other patrons filled the dining areas - all whom, seemed to be enjoying their experience.

Russ of the BML 11:07 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Chigwell 6:16 Tue Jan 29

ironsofcanada 9:40 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
HP

You a big fan of the passive voice?

Hammer and Pickle 9:27 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Comma after “patrons” Chigwell; otherwise you are fine.

ironsofcanada 8:44 Tue Jan 29
Re: English grammar question
Chigwell 6:16 Tue Jan 29

I think we got there in the end with something similar.

(Although stylistically some people might ding you there for passive voice in your main clause.)

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